Nominations
Date TBD


Boston/New England
Emmy Awards Gala
June 13, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JUDGING

Judging will begin in the next few weeks.

JUDGING PROCEDURE: Entries made to this Chapter will be judged by panels assembled by other NATAS Chapters. These panels should be comprised of no fewer than 6 qualified judges who shall be certified as peers. No more than 3 judges on a panel may be employed by the same station or company. Judges may not have a conflict of interest, which is described as having a direct involvement in the production of an entry, or having a personal relationship with a member of the production staff of an entry. Group ownership, by itself, does not necessarily create a conflict of interest.

NON-COMPETITIVE JUDGING: Entries are judged against a standard of excellence on their own merit and do not compete against each other. Program submissions are scored using a 1-10 scale each for Content, Creativity and Execution. Talent and Crafts are evaluated using a 1-10 scale each for Creativity and Execution. There may be one award, more than one award or no award given in each category. Any exceptions will be noted in the category description.

JUDGING REQUIREMENT: The success of the Emmy® Awards process depends on the willingness of qualified professionals to serve as judges. Peers in other NATAS Chapters are serving this Chapter’s entrants. This Chapter will judge other Chapter’s entries. By entering, you agree to serve as a judge when asked.

All entries sent to judges for screening are deemed to be eligible by the Chapter whose work is being judged. For that reason, judges are required to score each entry regardless if they feel it has been placed in the wrong category or might have technical problems. Forms are available online should judges wish to challenge any entry. On challenge entries, judges are asked to score without bias, even if they believe an entry is not in an appropriate category.

DISCLOSURE OF JUDGING RESULTS: In order to maintain fair, consistent peer judging without influence, judges must not disclose to others or in writing, including any social media references, as to how they have voted during an on-going, active judging session. If they ignore or abuse this privilege, their ballot will be disqualified and/or their judging status eliminated.

Peer Judging Defined

A peer judge is defined as any person with a minimum of two years of professional experience in the field of television program production, programming, or allied media who is directly engaged in or supervises the discipline they’re being asked to judge. Potential judges may also include professionals in allied fields, who by the specific nature of their work are uniquely qualified to make judgmental decisions concerning particular areas of television or media production. Examples of peer judges include: television and multi-media writers, producers, directors; programming, production and news executives; craft persons; advertising agency executives and creative directors involved in programming decisions; print journalists (who have hands-on television production experience); sports professionals; college university educators who represent journalism/film/television/media; former broadcast journalists, and media retirees.

To judge, teachers must either teach the specific crafts being judged, or have had professional experience performing the craft being judged.

Writing newspaper or magazine columns, blogs, and/or articles about television or media does not qualify a person as a peer in any category. Television critics are not peers, unless they also have previous professional experience.

Whenever a current job title does not obviously qualify a judge as a peer, the judge should list, on the judge’s certification section of the ballot, his/her previous experience, which qualifies him/her as a peer for the programs or crafts being judged.

(Note:  The success of the Emmy® awards process depends on the willingness of qualified professionals to serve as judges. As stipulated by the “Standard Clauses,” those persons entering the competition have agreed to serve as a judge, when asked.

Entry Screening

• Judges are chosen by The National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences because of their standing in the industry and professional expertise. They are expected to judge with the same care and respect required from others. The success of the Awards, the integrity of the Emmy® award itself, all depends on that care and respect.

• NATAS has arrived at national standard procedures that bring uniform clarity and fairness to Emmy® judging.

• Judges are not eligible to vote for any achievement in which they may have a personal or vested interest. In such cases, they are obliged to write “conflict of interest” in the place where they would normally mark their scores. A conflict of interest is described as having a direct involvement in the production of an entry, or having a personal relationship with a member of the production staff of an entry. Group ownership, by itself, does not necessarily create a conflict of interest.

• If a category has too many entries to view in a normal judging session, the panel may be split into two or more subpanels. However, an additional panel, a Blue Ribbon panel, must be assembled to screen those entries receiving the top four scores from each of these split panels. The Blue Ribbon panel must view each entry in its entirety. Members of this final panel may also have been members of the split panels.

• The National Awards Committee does permit the combining of preliminary and Blue Ribbon judging panels if the recommendations described above are followed.

• A standardized judging rating system for all Chapters has been provided by the National Awards Committee, to bring uniform clarity and fairness to Emmy® judging. Program or segment entries are judged on a scale of 1 to 10 on each of three criteria:  Content, Creativity and Execution. The final total for each entry judged has a potential of 30 points. Individual crafts achievement entries are rated on a scale of 1 to 10 on two criteria: Creativity and Execution, for a total of 20 points.
• Each entry must be given a score. No fractions or zeros may be used on the ballot.

• All entries sent to judges for screening are deemed to be eligible by the Chapter whose work is being judged. For that reason, judges are required to score each entry regardless if they feel it has been placed in the wrong category or might have technical problems. Forms are available should judges wish to challenge any entry.
• On challenge entries, judges are asked to score without bias, even if they believe an entry is not in an appropriate category.

• Included on the online judging ballot is a certification section. Each panel member will verify their professional credits to be a peer judge and state they have viewed the programs and/or crafts achievements as defined by the Chapter rules.

• Votes are confidential and are verified by your Chapter’s accounting firm.

• Judges must not disclose to others or in writing, including social media, how they have voted. If they ignore or abuse this privilege, their ballot will be disqualified and/or their judging status eliminated.

 

 

 

 


Any questions?  newenglandemmy@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Boston/New England Chapter is proud to be the gatekeeper of the most prestigious honor in the television industry.  The regional Emmy® Award is the standard-bearer for excellence, honoring original content created for traditional broadcast/cablecast mediums as well as non-traditional and emerging platforms for broadband and portable delivery.

NATAS is a non-profit, professional organization dedicated to fostering excellence in television.  The academy falls under IRS Code 501(c)(6), and the chapter’s Federal ID is 94-2938871